Acadian culture

Make a joyful noise, enjoy National Acadian Day!

Acadian flag

Acadian flag

Today, August 15th, is National Acadian Day. One of the ways to celebrate is by Tintamarre -- walk in the streets with the Acadian flag and make a loud noise. Use instruments or bang pots and pans, have fun and celebrate Acadian culture. August 15th was chose as National Acadian Day because it is the Feast Day of Our Lady of the Assumption, the patron saint of the Acadians.

In Albert County, NB, Acadians created the groundwork (literally) for our communities. Acadian settlers converted wetlands and forest into productive farmland – land that was later used by immigrants from Germany, the British Isles and the United States.

In 1698, Pierre Thibodeau and his seven sons, along with Pierre Gaudet, settled in Shepody or Chipoudie (between Hopewell Cape and Riverside-Albert). The men and their descendants cleared land. After cutting down trees, limbs and logs that weren’t used were burned. The ashes were spread on the land and helped to “sweeten” the soil (reduce acidity in the same way that an application of lime does).

In the marshlands, they dug canals, built dykes and made “aboiteaux.” This ingenious system involves a wooden box in the dyke between land and saltwater. The wooden flag moves only one way – it allows fresh water to drain from the crop land but doesn’t allow seawater to contaminate fields.

We don’t know exactly what crops were grown in Shepody, but in 1689 Acadian settlers near Aulac and Beaubassin raised cattle, sheep and hogs and grew rye, flax, barley, hemp, corn and tobacco. Water wheels were used to grind grain into flour. It is likely the farmers in Shepody grew the same or similar crops.

The Acadians were forced off their land by the British in the expulsion of 1755. Signs of their time on the land can be seen across Albert County – in the dykes and drained fields, some still used for farming.

On National Acadian Day, we can take time to honour our past and celebrate Acadian culture. Honk your horn, wave a flag and enjoy a great meal.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

Summer savory - the herb of Acadie

Summer savory

Summer savory

Summer savory plays a significant role in the food culture of Atlantic Canada. The herb is associated with holiday food and traditional meals. For example, turkey stuffing is often made with summer savory rather than sage (which is common in the rest of Canada).

Summer savory (“sarriette” in French) plays a special role in Acadian food culture. The herb is the main seasoning in fricot (rabbit or chicken stew) in Acadian communities in New Brunswick. It is also a component of the Herbes de Provence mix.

L’Ancienne d’Acadie is a Canadian variety of summer savory with a multicultural history – reflecting the various people who have lived in the region. It may have originally been brought to what is now New Brunswick by French or British settlers. Compared to modern varieties of summer savory, l’Ancienne d’Acadie is a short, stocky plant with a strong flavour.

The variety has been passed down from generation to generation. Jean Prudent Robichaud (1867-1958) received the seed from a woman from the Esgenoôpetitj First Nation at Burnt Church, NB, while he was working on Mi’kmaq farms using his draft horse. Burnt Church was a French settlement and Mi’kmaq community named for the incident in 1758 when the British burned the community’s church as part of the Acadian expulsion. Jean-Prudent’s descendants maintained the variety, which has been incorporated in the Slow Food Canada Ark of Taste.

You can learn how to grow summer savory and enjoy a delicious meal of fricot at the Albert County Museum on Saturday, July 29, 2017. All of this, including a garden tour and a lively discussion of the origins of fricot, costs just $8 with admission to the museum or a membership to the Albert County Historical Society (or $10 for others).

Please reserve tickets at the museum or by calling 734-2003 before July 26. The event starts at 11am and continues to at least 2pm. Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

For more information about the lunch, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com or Melody Land at 734-2003.

Lunch & Learn at the Museum: Fricot & Summer Savory, Saturday July 29th

Summer savory is a key ingredient in fricot.

Summer savory is a key ingredient in fricot.

On Saturday, July 29, 2017, learn how to grow summer savory, make fricot (Acadian chicken stew) and enjoy a great lunch.

The cost for the lunch (including dessert, tea or coffee), a garden tour and a lively discussion of the origins of fricot, costs just $8 with admission to the museum or a membership to the Albert County Historical Society (or $10 for others).  

If you’re interested in enjoying a tasty meal from local ingredients and learning about Acadian culture, please reserve tickets at the museum or by calling 734-2003 before July 26. The event starts at 11am and continues to at least 2pm. Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

For more information about the demonstration, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com or 734-2003.

 

Samedi le 29 juillet

Albert County Museum

11h00-14h+ Hopewell Cape, N.-B

Fricot Lunch & Learn

Venez découvrir comment préparer un fricot acadien et essayez-vous à récolterla sarriette d’été qui pousse dans le jardin héritage du musée. Ceci sera suivi d’un délicieux lunch tout en discutant de fricot et du rôle de la sarriette d’été dans la culture acadienne.

Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

Coût du lunch (avec du dessert et du the ou du café), tour de jardin & discussion: 8$ avec le coût d’entrée au musée ou un membership, 10$ autres. Svp demandez vos billets au musée ou  réservez en téléphonant 734-2003 avant jeudi le 26 juillet.

Pour plus d’information svp communiquer avec Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com ou 734-2003

Ce projet a été rendu possible en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.