World War One

Lest We Forget - William Bert Fowler - Died in Hospital - 101 Years Ago 02.21.1917

Lest We Forget -  William Bert Fowler - Died in Hospital - 101 Years Ago 02.21.1917

William Bert Fowler, 817475 was from Elgin, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born July 9, 1895. He was born in London, England. He enlisted with the 140th Battalion on November 1, 1915 in Sussex, NB. Read More...

Lest We Forget - Robert Archibald Colpitts - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 08.15.1917

Robert Archibald Colpitts, 709672 was born in Liverpool, England and was born July 4,  1893. He was the son of George W. and Margaret (Gardiner) Colpitts. He enlisted with the 104 Battalion on November 3, 1915. His occupation at the time of attestation was listed as a farmer. He was listed as Missing in Action and presumed dead during the Battle of Hill 70 while fighting with the 26th New Brunswick Battalion on August 15, 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Vimy Monument :Pas de Calais, France. 

 You can find his complete war records by clicking here.

He is Commemorated on Page 218 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

A virtual memorial can be found here. \

A Memorial Plaque was crafted in his honour with an excellent write up and can be found here. 

The museum is also fortunate to have his mother's silver cross medal, which can be viewed at the museum. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lest We Forget - Dallas Churchill Conner - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 06.18.1917

Dallas Churchill Conner - 283022, was from Alma, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born March 11, 1883. He was the son of John T. Conner and Catherine Conner, of Hillsborough, Albert Co., New Brunswick. His occupation was listed as farmer. He enlisted with the 219th Over Seas Highland Battalion on March 8, 1916 in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. He was killed in action June 18, 1917 serving with the 85th Battalion. He is buried at CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France.

 You can find his complete service records  by clicking here.

He is listed on page 219 of Canada's Book of Remembrance.

You can view his internment records here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lest We Forget - Arthur Everett Tingley - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 04.28.1917

Arthur Everett Tingley, 830262 was from Midway, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born June 26, 1896. He was the son of Otis K. and Huldah Tingley, of Midway, Albert County, New Brunswick. He enlisted with the 144th Battalion on December 21, 1915. His occupation was listed as student. He served overseas with 8th Battalion (Manitoba Regiment). He has no known grave and is remembered on the Vimy Monument. 

 You can find his attestation papers by clicking here.

He is listed on page 339 of Canada's Book of Remembrance.

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

LEST WE FORGET - On This Day 100 Years Ago Norman Yeomans was Killed in Action - 04.17.1917

Norman Yeomans was from Elgin, New Brunswick. He was born in 1891.  Son of Elias Millage and Catherine (Powers) Yeomans. He was Killed in Action in France at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. 

We were unable to find any further information on him. If anyone has any please forward it to us, so we can properly honour him. 

He is commemorated on the family tombstone in Elgin, NB.  

Lest We Forget - Charles Lawson Fenton - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 04.12.1917

Charles Lawson Fenton, 817985 was from Hillsborough, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born September 3, 1893. He was the son of Lawson Fenton and Ruth Fenton of Edgett's Landing, New Brunswick. He enlisted with the 140th Battalion on March 22, 1916. His occupation was listed as quarryman. He served overseas with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regt.). He died as a result of wounds April 12, 1917 at Vimy Ridge, France. He is buried at LAPUGNOY MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. 

 You can find his complete service records  by clicking here.

He is listed on page 236 of Canada's Book of Remembrance.

You can view his internment records here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lest We Forget - Albert County's First World War Honour Roll

Aftermath

This poem was written by Pte. Frank Walker just after the battle of the Somme 100 years ago in 1916 and was published in From a Stretcher Handle: The World War I Journal & Poems of Pte. Frank Walker.

The book is a first-person narrative centred around the life and times of Prince Edward Islander Frank Walker (1893-1977), during his service with the Canadian Field Ambulance, Canadian Medical Corps, from its inception in 1914 until 1919, after the Great War had come to a close.

With Desolation and the Stars
I lonely vigil keep,
Over the garner'd fields of Mars,
Watching the dead men sleep —
Huddled together, so silent there.
With bloodless faces and clotted hair, 
Wrapped in their long, long sleep!

By uptorn trees and crater rims
Along the Ridge they lie,
Sprawled in the mud, with out-spread limbs,
Wide staring at the sky.
Why to the sky do they always stare,
Questioning heaven in dumb despair?
Why don't they moan, or sigh?

Why do I rave, ‘neath the callous stars,
At their upturned faces white?
I, surely I, with my crimson scars
Slumber with them this night!
Death, with shadowy finger bare,
Beckons me on to — I know not where;
But, huddled together, and freed from care
We'll watch till the dawn of Light.

From the Somme,
1916

Lest We Forget - On this day 100 years ago Roy William Crossman was Killed in Action - 10.09.1916

Roy William Crossman was from Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick and was born December 7, 1894. He was the son of Mr. William D. Crossman. He enlisted with the Royal Canadian Regiment on August 22, 1915. He was first wounded April 4, 1916 with a gunshot wound to the scalp. He was Killed in Action in France at the Battle of the Somme, October 9, 1916. He is remembered on the Vimy Monument and has no known grave.

 You can find his complete service record by clicking here.

You can view his internment records here. 

You can view the Royal Canadian Regiment's War Diary Entry for that day here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

 

 

 

Lest We Forget - Donald MacKenzie Moore - Killed in Action 101 Years Ago Today 05.22.1915

Donald MacKenzie Moore was from Hopewell, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born March 19, 1877. He listed his next of kin as C. Archie Moore of Vancouver, BC. He enlisted with the 30th Battalion in Victoria, BC on November 9, 1914. He was listed as Wounded and Missing in Action during the Battle of Festubert in France on May 22, 1915. He has no known grave and is memorialized on the Vimy Monument. 

 You can find his complete service record by clicking here.

You can view his internment records here. 

You can view the 16th Battalions War Diary Entry for that day here.  And Here. 

You can learn about the Battle of Festubert Here.

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

On the 99th Anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge - April 9, 1917 - An Update

It was 99 years ago today, (April 9, 1917)  that the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) fought the Battle of Vimy Ridge. It was the first time the Canadian Corps fought together as a single unit and achieved the first Allied Victory of the War.  It was also the day the 27th Battalion captured the K14 10.5cm Cannon (s/n 590) that sits in Hopewell Cape Square. The people of Albert County won the cannon in the 1919 Victory Loans Competition for raising the greatest percentage over their target anywhere in New Brunswick. The County raised three times their goal of $110,000.00 with a realized sum of $347,600.00 (6.92 million in today's dollars). 

The capture of the K14 cannon is a story legends are made of, fighting in the third wave of the attack, the men of the 27th Battalion stormed the enemy lines, while Bandsman Paddy Smith played the regimental march on his piccolo. In the words of the company commander, "The battalion charged the last 50 yards with a cheer and leaped into the gun pits, where the gunners put up a stout fight. Our line lead by Captain Lane seized the guns, put out of action those of the crew who resisted and took the remainder prisoners, and prevented the guns from being dismantled." What a story of courage and sacrifice, it sends shivers down my spine every time I read it. 

Two days later on the 11th, these guns were turned on the enemy under direction of officers from the Canadian 6th ARTILLERY Brigade, and sent back several thousand rounds captured with them. So not only did our cannon fight for the enemy, the Canadians turned the cannon back on them and returned the favour. It's amazing, that the cannon which sits in Hopewell Cape not only fought against our troops, but then fought with them. What a story!

That's not all though, through the detailed notes of the 27th Battalion, we can pinpoint on a map the exact location where the cannon was on the battlefield. Which we can view on Google maps, what was 99 years ago a battlefield, is now happily, a family's backyard complete with a swing set and slide. 

So today while we pause and remember the sacrifices of the Canadians 99 years ago, it's fitting to give an update on our own campaign to restore their captured trophy. The Victory Cannon Campaign has raised over $10000.00 to date of a goal of $15000.00, we are on the last stretch of our campaign. So please donate. CLICK TO DONATE

The cannon wheels of the K14 are in the process of being restored, our Wheelwright Mike Hartigan is currently working on them. What is left to do on the project, is to complete the restoration of the cement pads the cannons sit on. Then to give the cannons a good primer coat and paint them in their original camouflage markings. Then we need to develop a fitting way to tell their exciting story. The Museum is researching ways to best tell the cannons' story; from their capture on Vimy Ridge, to their being turned and firing back on the enemy, and then being won by Albert County in the 1919 Victory Loans Campaign. 

Now that's a story worth saving!

The Victory Cannon Campaign is raising funds to restore the two captured World War One cannons that sit in Hopewell Cape. These cannons were captured by Canadians during the Great War, and were awarded to the people of Albert County. You can donate online to the Victory Cannon Campaign here, and best of all you'll be sent a tax receipt!  Click Here to Donate!

Lest We Forget - On This Day 100 Years Ago Charles Humphrey Berry was Killed in Action - 03.27.1916

Charles Humphrey Berry was from Hillsborough, New Brunswick and was born February 18, 1892. He listed his next of kin as Mrs. Sarah Crossman of Dorchester, NB. He enlisted with the 55th Battalion on May 5, 1915 and transferred to the 26th Battalion on November 5, 1915. He was Killed in Action in France on March 27, 1916. He was listed as killed by shell fire. He is buried at the La Laiterie Military Cemetary in Belgium.

 You can find his complete service record by clicking here.

You can view his internment records here. 

You can view the 26th Battalions War Diary Entry for that day here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

A Window on the Great War - A Christmas Letter from the Trenches, December 20, 1915 Belgium

One Hundred years ago today (Dec 20, 2015), Hugh C. Wright from Shepody, Albert County, NB was busy fighting with the 26th New Brunswick battalion in trenches of Belgium. He was only 20 years old at the time. This was one of his letters home and was written December 20, 1915.  

A note on the Author - Hugh Carlisle Wright, from Hopewell,(Shepody), Albert County, NB, enlisted in the 26th Battalion on November 17, 1914. He was 19 years of age. He was in A Company, No. 1 Platoon while training in Saint John. He served in the 26th Battalion, 5th Infantry Brigade in Belgium and France and spent 17 months in the trenches. In February 1917, he transferred to the 4th Siege Battery, 2nd Brigade CGA and was a gunner for the remainder of the war. He was discharged in May 10, 1919...on his birthday!

Hugh's letters are addressed … “Dear Father” because his mother died when he was only 7 years old. Harvey and Clarke were Hugh's older brothers. His brother Clarke enlisted in October 1915, arriving in England with CEF April 1916. Harvey didn't enlist but stayed home to run the family farm in Shepody. 

With many thanks to Hugh Wright's great niece, Dawne McLean who kindly submitted the letter.

Belgium
Dec 20, 1915

My Dear Father,

I received your letter of Dec. 5th to day and was glad to get it. I have got the moccasins and the stuff alright. I had the moccasins on this last time in the trenches and I didn’t have to put on a pair of hip boots all the time we were in as I never was over the tops of these. They are fine.
I shall be on the look out for the parcel from Gordon. I had a letter from Uncle Silas while we were up in the trenches and he said that Mrs. Cook and he were sending me a large parcel, so with all the others I hear that are coming I will not do too bad. I saw a list of stuff that is in the boxes for us from home and it sounds good so I am anxiously waiting for them.
I don’t need hip rubber boots as we have them when in the trenches.

Uncle Silas said in his letter that Blair had enlisted and I think it will be the best thing for him as a good rough life is just what he needs. I haven’t seen many that have failed on it in this Batt.
I hope Clarke doesn’t get away before Xmas as he will enjoy it better home.

Our Company will be in as usual just back of the front line on Xmas Day. We go in there on Xmas Eve (some different place to go on Xmas eve than I had last year), but we will make the best of it wherever we are.

I haven’t had a letter from Clarke for some time. I was expecting one from him today but none came. You ought to get my pay alright as I fixed it up with the paymaster some time ago.

It would be a nice thing if the three counties could raise a Batt. I must write to Mrs. Carnwarth just as soon as I get time. I sent her a Xmas Card some time ago. I don’t know of anything I can send here for they don’t have anything over here any good. I have some good pieces of aluminum off the nose of shells, but it is hard to send anything like that home.

There has been terrible artillery fire for these last two days and it is still at it tonight. The report is here that the Germans tried the gas but the wind changed and it went back at themselves.
I think there is something going to happen pretty soon and the sooner the better and get this thing over as soon as possible.

Well, I must close and get ready to go out on fatigue tonight.

I just got a nice big parcel from Uncle Silas tonight with some cake, cookies and chocolate. It was a dandy box. Walter Danahy and Stevens were here so I gave them some and will give Silas some in the morning.

Good night, Hugh

(letter cont’d next day)

I received a nice parcel from Aunt Berta last night so I have plenty to eat for a few days anyway.
This writing paper is a little tablet that we got in a little book with envelopes in it - a present from the women of Canada.

This is all for this time.
Hugh

Hugh was one of the hundreds of Albert County men who volunteered for the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), the majority joining the New Brunswick 26th Battalion. It was because of their sacrifices that Albert County was awarded the 77mm field cannon which sits in the square in Hopewell Cape. The museum is in process of restoring this cannon to help preserve their stories.  If you have not done so, please donate to the Victory Cannon Campaign. You can donate online here.