Squash

Squash, including winter squash, zucchini, pumpkins and summer squash, are all derived from crops grown by several First Nations in North and Central America.

At the Albert County Museum garden, we will plant several types of squash that were grown by First Nations and settlers. Although the Mi’kmaq were nomadic people who relied on wild plants and game for food, the other First Nations of New Brunswick, the Maliseet and the Passamaquoddy, cultivated crops including squash.

Today, gardeners can preserve the agricultural heritage of the Wabanaki by growing heirloom varieties of squash that have been passed down from generation of generation. The following heirloom varieties are all derived from squash grown by the Wabanaki in the Maritimes and/or New England (according to Dr. Fred Wiseman of the Seeds of Renewal Project).

  • Canada crookneck
  • Connecticut field pumpkin
  • White scallop squash
  • Curtis/Penobscot pumpkin
  • Algonquin squash
  • East Montpelier squash
  • East Montpelier Turk’s Cap squash
  • Boston marrow squash
  • Worcester Pumpkin

At the Albert County Museum garden, we will plant Canada crookneck squash in honour of Canada's 150th year.
 

 This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada.

This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada.