Foods of the Fundy Vally Bee Keeping Workshop

Bee Keeping Workshop 2018

Introduction to Bee Keeping Workshop

June 2nd

9am-4pm

Albert County Museum, Community Hall

*Lunch will be provided*

Beekeeping is a fun and interesting hobby that allows you to produce the delicious treat of honey while helping the environment. Learn the basic principles necessary to begin this fascinating hobby. Topics include: overview of the honey bee colony; beekeeping tools and equipment; how to start with honey bees; swarming; honeyflow and harvesting of hive products; diseases, pests and enemies; hive and queen management; and beekeeping throughout the year. No prior knowledge of honeybees or beekeeping is required.

Instructor Bio:

Karen Thurlow started beekeeping in 1978 and is a certified Master Beekeeper. She is the owner of New Moon Apiary and manages 60 hives of her own in Cumberland County, Maine. Karen teaches bee disease and microscopy classes to other beekeepers. She sells package bees, nucleus hives, and raises and sells queen bees during the beekeeping season. She also sells raw honey, spiced creamed honey, and products she makes from her hives such as lotions, salves, and lip balms. Karen managed a bee equipment supply store for 7 years helping many beginner beekeepers get set up with the equipment they needed to start their beekeeping hobby.  You can find her on Facebook or visit her website.

 

You can register by following this link.  http://foodsofthefundyvalley.ca/bee-keeping-workshop-2018

The cost of the workshop is $40 for members of Foods of the Fundy Valley or $45 for non-members.

 

Workshop Sept 24th ~ Sauerkraut, kimchi & more: learn the traditional art of lacto-fermentation

Sourdough bread, anchovies, chocolate, cheese, Kosher dill pickles and yogurt… what do these all have in common? They are all products of lacto-fermentation.
Lacto-fermentation is a complicated word for a simple process: a way to preserve food by allowing it to ferment.
You can learn the art of lacto-fermentation on Sunday, September 24th from 1:30 to 4:30pm at the Albert County Museum in Hopewell Cape.

preserves.JPG


To preserve certain foods, such as sourdough or yogurt, a culture is added to the fresh food. The culture (i.e., a bit of yogurt or bread dough) contains microorganisms that transform the raw ingredient into a more stable and nutritious food.
Preserving vegetables is even more simple. Basically, you can preserve vegetables by adding water and salt.  No boiling water baths, no pressure cookers…. Just a few simple steps. The result is placed in a cool place and allowed to ferment.
The preserves are more digestible than the original vegetables and the food contains probiotics.
Every culture has a tradition of lacto-fermentation. For example, cabbage is preserved as sauerkraut in Germany and preserved (along with hot peppers and other vegetables) as Kimchi in Korea.
You can learn the art of lacto-fermentation on Sunday, September 24th from 1:30 to 4:30pm at the Albert County Museum in Hopewell Cape.
Ruth Merrett will show participants how to make their own ferments. At the end of the workshop, you will take home not only the skills to preserve food but also at least three jars of preserved vegetables.
Participants will bring vegetables and jars, and return home with new skills and three bottles of preserves. Cost: $15.
Advance registration is required. Contact the museum by dropping by, by calling 734-2003, or email Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com.
This project has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. Ce projet a été rendu possible en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.


Once you learn the basics, try these recipes
 
Apple Spice Sauerkraut
 
Cabbage
Salt
3 apples, grated,  per medium sized cabbage
1 tablespoon of grated ginger per cabbage
1 teaspoon cinnamon per cabbage
¼ or less teaspoon ground clove per cabbage
 
Chop cabbage, massage and add salt.
Add all the other ingredients.
Pack tightly in a jar and cover with a filter or cloth. Taste daily. Refrigerate when you are happy with the taste.

Basic Salsa from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon
 
4 medium tomatoes, diced
2 small onions, finely chopped
3⁄4 cup chile peppers, hot or mild
6-8 cloves garlic
1 bunch cilantro
1 teaspoon dried oregano
juice of 2 lemons or limes
1 tablespoon of sea salt
1⁄4 cup clean, unchlorinated drinking water (may not be necessary) 
 
Mix, press into jars. Let ferment 1 to 2 days in a warm kitchen and then put in the fridge. Use a glass weight to keep the mass under liquid or pour olive oil on top.
 

A tisket, a tasket, learn to weave a wicker basket: August 26

Watch this type of basket being made

Watch this type of basket being made

Basket weavers will be busy on Saturday, August 26th, and the Albert County Museum. Drop by and watch them at work and learn how to weave a wicker basket.

We will use willow branches to make a functional basket - the type that could be used to gather food from the field or the forest.

An Acadian basket weaver and three other weavers (with varying levels of experience) will demonstrate how to make a basket from willow branches. This free demonstration will begin at 10am and finish at 4pm. Feel free to drop in at any point, or several times, to see the process, take pictures and ask questions.

Feel free to visit the museum garden as well and ask the Museum Gardener, Janet Wallace, questions about organic gardening.

Apprenez comment faire un panier en tiges de saule. Venez observer des vanniers. Posez des questions et prenez des photos.

Cette démonstration de Vannerie en Osier est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

For more information about the demonstration, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com.

“Growing Together: Seeds from the past; seeds for the future” is funded in part by the Government of Canada. Ce projet est financé en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.

Summer savory - the herb of Acadie

Summer savory

Summer savory

Summer savory plays a significant role in the food culture of Atlantic Canada. The herb is associated with holiday food and traditional meals. For example, turkey stuffing is often made with summer savory rather than sage (which is common in the rest of Canada).

Summer savory (“sarriette” in French) plays a special role in Acadian food culture. The herb is the main seasoning in fricot (rabbit or chicken stew) in Acadian communities in New Brunswick. It is also a component of the Herbes de Provence mix.

L’Ancienne d’Acadie is a Canadian variety of summer savory with a multicultural history – reflecting the various people who have lived in the region. It may have originally been brought to what is now New Brunswick by French or British settlers. Compared to modern varieties of summer savory, l’Ancienne d’Acadie is a short, stocky plant with a strong flavour.

The variety has been passed down from generation to generation. Jean Prudent Robichaud (1867-1958) received the seed from a woman from the Esgenoôpetitj First Nation at Burnt Church, NB, while he was working on Mi’kmaq farms using his draft horse. Burnt Church was a French settlement and Mi’kmaq community named for the incident in 1758 when the British burned the community’s church as part of the Acadian expulsion. Jean-Prudent’s descendants maintained the variety, which has been incorporated in the Slow Food Canada Ark of Taste.

You can learn how to grow summer savory and enjoy a delicious meal of fricot at the Albert County Museum on Saturday, July 29, 2017. All of this, including a garden tour and a lively discussion of the origins of fricot, costs just $8 with admission to the museum or a membership to the Albert County Historical Society (or $10 for others).

Please reserve tickets at the museum or by calling 734-2003 before July 26. The event starts at 11am and continues to at least 2pm. Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

For more information about the lunch, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com or Melody Land at 734-2003.

Lunch & Learn at the Museum: Fricot & Summer Savory, Saturday July 29th

Summer savory is a key ingredient in fricot.

Summer savory is a key ingredient in fricot.

On Saturday, July 29, 2017, learn how to grow summer savory, make fricot (Acadian chicken stew) and enjoy a great lunch.

The cost for the lunch (including dessert, tea or coffee), a garden tour and a lively discussion of the origins of fricot, costs just $8 with admission to the museum or a membership to the Albert County Historical Society (or $10 for others).  

If you’re interested in enjoying a tasty meal from local ingredients and learning about Acadian culture, please reserve tickets at the museum or by calling 734-2003 before July 26. The event starts at 11am and continues to at least 2pm. Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

For more information about the demonstration, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com or 734-2003.

 

Samedi le 29 juillet

Albert County Museum

11h00-14h+ Hopewell Cape, N.-B

Fricot Lunch & Learn

Venez découvrir comment préparer un fricot acadien et essayez-vous à récolterla sarriette d’été qui pousse dans le jardin héritage du musée. Ceci sera suivi d’un délicieux lunch tout en discutant de fricot et du rôle de la sarriette d’été dans la culture acadienne.

Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

Coût du lunch (avec du dessert et du the ou du café), tour de jardin & discussion: 8$ avec le coût d’entrée au musée ou un membership, 10$ autres. Svp demandez vos billets au musée ou  réservez en téléphonant 734-2003 avant jeudi le 26 juillet.

Pour plus d’information svp communiquer avec Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com ou 734-2003

Ce projet a été rendu possible en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.

 

 

Roots of history: seeking plants

At the Albert County Museum, we are reviving the perennial gardens. If you are dividing your plants this spring, we might be able to provide a home for your surplus.

In particular, we are looking for perennials with traditional uses, such as the following:

  • Culinary herbs (e.g., sage, oregano)

  • Food plants (e.g., grapes, gooseberries)

  • Herbs for teas and tisanes (e.g., lemon balm, peppermint, bergamot)

  • Medicinal herbs (e.g., Echinacea, hops)

  • Plants used as dyes (e.g., madder, woad)

  • Plants with other uses (e.g., soapwort, sweetgrass)

    We are also looking for seeds, rootstock and cuttings of fruits and vegetables with a history of being grown in Albert County.

    If you would like to donate any plants, please contact Janet Wallace (email garden@albertcountymuseum.com) to see if we can use the plants.  Please provide labels with the plants. If you have a story behind the plants, please let us know. For example, we would love to know the history of your plant (when and where it was originally planted or found) and also how you have used it.

    If you would like to volunteer to help in the garden – perhaps you want to choose a spot and plant the perennials yourself, or you might like to help out in the vegetable garden, we welcome your help.

     

Do you have plants to share? 

Do you have plants to share?