Lest We Forget - Frank John Coram - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 08.16.1917

Frank John Coram, 709116 was from Middlesex, Albert County, New Brunswick and was born March 6, 1896. He was the son of Mr. Albert Coram and Mrs. Fannie Coram. He enlisted with the 104 Battalion on October 21, 1915. His occupation was listed as labourer. He was listed as Killed in Action while fighting with the 26th New Brunswick Battalion on August 16, 1917 at the Battle of Hill 70. He is commemorated on the Vimy Monument; Pas de Calais, France. 

 You can find his complete war records by clicking here.

He is Commemorated on Page 220 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

A virtual memorial can be found here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lest We Forget - Robert Archibald Colpitts - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 08.15.1917

Robert Archibald Colpitts, 709672 was born in Liverpool, England and was born July 4,  1893. He was the son of George W. and Margaret (Gardiner) Colpitts. He enlisted with the 104 Battalion on November 3, 1915. His occupation at the time of attestation was listed as a farmer. He was listed as Missing in Action and presumed dead during the Battle of Hill 70 while fighting with the 26th New Brunswick Battalion on August 15, 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Vimy Monument :Pas de Calais, France. 

 You can find his complete war records by clicking here.

He is Commemorated on Page 218 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

A virtual memorial can be found here. \

A Memorial Plaque was crafted in his honour with an excellent write up and can be found here. 

The museum is also fortunate to have his mother's silver cross medal, which can be viewed at the museum. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Make a joyful noise, enjoy National Acadian Day!

Acadian flag

Acadian flag

Today, August 15th, is National Acadian Day. One of the ways to celebrate is by Tintamarre -- walk in the streets with the Acadian flag and make a loud noise. Use instruments or bang pots and pans, have fun and celebrate Acadian culture. August 15th was chose as National Acadian Day because it is the Feast Day of Our Lady of the Assumption, the patron saint of the Acadians.

In Albert County, NB, Acadians created the groundwork (literally) for our communities. Acadian settlers converted wetlands and forest into productive farmland – land that was later used by immigrants from Germany, the British Isles and the United States.

In 1698, Pierre Thibodeau and his seven sons, along with Pierre Gaudet, settled in Shepody or Chipoudie (between Hopewell Cape and Riverside-Albert). The men and their descendants cleared land. After cutting down trees, limbs and logs that weren’t used were burned. The ashes were spread on the land and helped to “sweeten” the soil (reduce acidity in the same way that an application of lime does).

In the marshlands, they dug canals, built dykes and made “aboiteaux.” This ingenious system involves a wooden box in the dyke between land and saltwater. The wooden flag moves only one way – it allows fresh water to drain from the crop land but doesn’t allow seawater to contaminate fields.

We don’t know exactly what crops were grown in Shepody, but in 1689 Acadian settlers near Aulac and Beaubassin raised cattle, sheep and hogs and grew rye, flax, barley, hemp, corn and tobacco. Water wheels were used to grind grain into flour. It is likely the farmers in Shepody grew the same or similar crops.

The Acadians were forced off their land by the British in the expulsion of 1755. Signs of their time on the land can be seen across Albert County – in the dykes and drained fields, some still used for farming.

On National Acadian Day, we can take time to honour our past and celebrate Acadian culture. Honk your horn, wave a flag and enjoy a great meal.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

Summer savory - the herb of Acadie

Summer savory

Summer savory

Summer savory plays a significant role in the food culture of Atlantic Canada. The herb is associated with holiday food and traditional meals. For example, turkey stuffing is often made with summer savory rather than sage (which is common in the rest of Canada).

Summer savory (“sarriette” in French) plays a special role in Acadian food culture. The herb is the main seasoning in fricot (rabbit or chicken stew) in Acadian communities in New Brunswick. It is also a component of the Herbes de Provence mix.

L’Ancienne d’Acadie is a Canadian variety of summer savory with a multicultural history – reflecting the various people who have lived in the region. It may have originally been brought to what is now New Brunswick by French or British settlers. Compared to modern varieties of summer savory, l’Ancienne d’Acadie is a short, stocky plant with a strong flavour.

The variety has been passed down from generation to generation. Jean Prudent Robichaud (1867-1958) received the seed from a woman from the Esgenoôpetitj First Nation at Burnt Church, NB, while he was working on Mi’kmaq farms using his draft horse. Burnt Church was a French settlement and Mi’kmaq community named for the incident in 1758 when the British burned the community’s church as part of the Acadian expulsion. Jean-Prudent’s descendants maintained the variety, which has been incorporated in the Slow Food Canada Ark of Taste.

You can learn how to grow summer savory and enjoy a delicious meal of fricot at the Albert County Museum on Saturday, July 29, 2017. All of this, including a garden tour and a lively discussion of the origins of fricot, costs just $8 with admission to the museum or a membership to the Albert County Historical Society (or $10 for others).

Please reserve tickets at the museum or by calling 734-2003 before July 26. The event starts at 11am and continues to at least 2pm. Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

For more information about the lunch, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com or Melody Land at 734-2003.

Lest We Forget - Wylie Freeman Dives - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 07.16.1917

Wylie Freeman Dives, 832636 was from Elgin, Albert County, New Brunswick and was born December 5, 1895. He was the son of Roland Dives, of Meadow Elgin, Albert Co., New Brunswick, Canada.. He enlisted with the 145th Battalion on May 10, 1916. He was listed as Killed in Action at while fighting with the 10th Battalion on July 16, 1917 at Loos, france. He is buried at the Maroc British Cemetery, Nord, France.

 You can find his complete war records by clicking here.

He is Commemorated on Page 228 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

A virtual memorial can be found here. 

His gravesite information can be found here.  

The 10th Battalion's War Diary for July 16, 1917 can be found here and here

Please if you have any photos of Wylie send them to us. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lest We Forget - Clyde E Newcomb - Killed in Action 101 Years Ago Today 07.14.1916

Clyde E Newcomb was from Memel, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born March 5, 1892. He was the son of J. Albert Newcomb and Ella Newcomb, of Shepody, Albert Co., New Brunswick. He enlisted with the 26th Battalion on November 28, 1914. He is buried at RENINGHELST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY. 

You can view his complete military records here. 

 You can find his attestation papers by clicking here.

He is listed on page 141 of Canada's Book of Remembrance.

You can view his internment records here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lunch & Learn at the Museum: Fricot & Summer Savory, Saturday July 29th

Summer savory is a key ingredient in fricot.

Summer savory is a key ingredient in fricot.

On Saturday, July 29, 2017, learn how to grow summer savory, make fricot (Acadian chicken stew) and enjoy a great lunch.

The cost for the lunch (including dessert, tea or coffee), a garden tour and a lively discussion of the origins of fricot, costs just $8 with admission to the museum or a membership to the Albert County Historical Society (or $10 for others).  

If you’re interested in enjoying a tasty meal from local ingredients and learning about Acadian culture, please reserve tickets at the museum or by calling 734-2003 before July 26. The event starts at 11am and continues to at least 2pm. Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

This is part of Growing Together – a project which celebrates Canada's 150th year through food, seeds and stories! This has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. 

For more information about the demonstration, museum garden or storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com or 734-2003.

 

Samedi le 29 juillet

Albert County Museum

11h00-14h+ Hopewell Cape, N.-B

Fricot Lunch & Learn

Venez découvrir comment préparer un fricot acadien et essayez-vous à récolterla sarriette d’été qui pousse dans le jardin héritage du musée. Ceci sera suivi d’un délicieux lunch tout en discutant de fricot et du rôle de la sarriette d’été dans la culture acadienne.

Cette démonstration est offerte en français et en anglais; this demonstration is offered in French and English.

Coût du lunch (avec du dessert et du the ou du café), tour de jardin & discussion: 8$ avec le coût d’entrée au musée ou un membership, 10$ autres. Svp demandez vos billets au musée ou  réservez en téléphonant 734-2003 avant jeudi le 26 juillet.

Pour plus d’information svp communiquer avec Janet Wallace at garden@albertcountymuseum.com ou 734-2003

Ce projet a été rendu possible en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.

 

 

Lest We Forget - Herbett Carter - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 07.09.1917

Herbett Carter - 709170, was from Elgin, Albert Co., New Brunswick and was born August 29, 1886. He was the son of Ralph and Jane Carter, of Elgin, New Brunswick. He enlisted with the 26th New Brunswick Battalion on September 24, 1915. He was killed in action July 9, 1917. He is buried at Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery, British Extension, France.

 You can find his complete service records  by clicking here.

He is listed on page 214 of Canada's Book of Remembrance.

You can view his internment records here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

Lest We Forget - Floyd William Gayton - Killed in Action 100 Years Ago Today 07.04.1917

Floyd William Gayton, 709178 was from Hillsborough, Albert County, New Brunswick and was born October 5, 1893. He was the son of Mrs. Hannibal B. Steeves (formerly Gayton), of Hillsboro, Albert Co., New Brunswick, and the late James Gayton. He enlisted with the 64 Battalion on September 27, 1915. He was listed as Killed in Action at while fighting with the 26th New Brunswick Battalion on July 04, 1917. He is buried at the BULLY-GRENAY COMMUNAL CEMETERY, BRITISH EXTENSION ; Pas de Calais, France. 

 You can find his complete war records by clicking here.

He is Commemorated on Page 242 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

A virtual memorial can be found here. 

His gravesite information can be found here.  

The 26th Battalion's War Diary for July 4, 1917 can be found here. 

If anyone has any further information, photos or memories they would like to share please pass them along. 

The History of the Hot Dog

Photo by bhofack2/iStock / Getty Images

Photo by bhofack2/iStock / Getty Images

On Canada Day, visitors to the Albert County Museum will be offered free grilled hot dogs, so we decided to explore the history of the hot dog with “all the fixings.”

The hot dog can be traced back to Europe. Germany and Austria both lay claim to the meat –  Frankfurters come from Frankfurt, Germany, but wienerwurst (i.e., wieners) come from Vienna, Austria (in the German language, Vienna is called “Wien”).

The term “hot dog” is American and there are reports of frankfurters being sold on the streets of New York as early as the 1860s. The exact origins are unknown but it seems like immigrants in New York created the hot dog stand fad – possibly a Jewish immigrant from Poland named Nathan Handwerker or an African-American immigrant called Thomas Francis Xavier Morris. The key point being that the hot dog, like so many other foods, is the product of a blend of cultures.

What about the condiments?

Ketchup comes from the Far East, likely China, and was commonly consumed on long sea voyages. The first ketchup, called “ge-thcup” or “koe-cheup,” didn’t have tomatoes but was made from fermented fish entrails, miscellaneous meat byproducts and soybeans. Being fermented, the sauce stored well and spiced up the plain food of long trips at sea. The ketchup became popular along the trade routes in Indonesia and the Philippines. In the early 1700s, British explorers brought the condiment back to England.   

Ketchup soon referred to a fermented sauce of any number of ingredients, including fish, nuts, peaches, oysters, elderberries, anchovies, and (you guessed it) tomatoes.

Mustard is made by crushing the seeds of the mustard plant (which is related to broccoli and cabbage) and adding wine or “must,” very young wine. The difference between grainy and smooth mustard is simply the state of the seeds – coarsely ground seeds or a combination of whole and ground seeds are used in grainy mustard; smooth mustard has finely ground grains.

The Romans used mustard as a flavouring. They planted mustard when they conquered new areas – including Gaul (now called France). The condiment was a hit –with mustard growing well in the vineyards and Dijon and other mustards were developed.

Sauerkraut was developed as a way to store cabbage during the winter. The cabbage was shredded, salt was added, and the concoction was left in a covered crock to ferment. At the Albert County Museum, we’re growing Tancook cabbage, a variety named after the Nova Scotia Island where it was commonly grown. Tancook sauerkraut was a huge export for the small island – barrels of sauerkraut were often on sailing ships. Sauerkraut contains vitamin C, and regular consumption could prevent scurvy, a hazardous dietary condition common among sailors. Read more here.

So when you bite into your hot dog, keep in mind that, as with all foods, you’re consuming history. An all-dressed hot dog is the result of long sea voyages, the tendency of people to explore new lands and conquer other nations, the need to preserve food, and the desire for street food.

Learn more about the history of food at the Albert County museum’s website. Check often as we will keep adding new stories. Better yet, visit the Albert County Museum and garden in Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick. 

For more information about the museum garden and storytelling project, please contact Janet Wallace (email garden@albertcountymuseum.com). “Growing Together: Seeds from the past; seeds for the future” is funded in part by the Government of Canada. Ce projet est financé en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.

Written by Janet Wallace

References:

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/ketchup-a-saucy-history

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/break-out-the-buns-the-history-of-the-hot-dog

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/04/137530290/searching-history-for-the-hot-dogs-origin

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/ketchup-a-saucy-history

https://www.thespruce.com/history-of-mustard-as-food-1807631

 

 

Canada Without RB Bennett

This year the Albert County Museum is celebrating the 7th Annual RB Bennett Day in conjunction with our Canada 150 celebrations. Why, though, do we have such a day? Why is RB Bennett so important? Sure, he was born and raised in Hopewell Cape. He was the 11th Prime Minister of Canada. But really. What’s the big deal with this guy anyway?

Sometimes, the best way to answer a question is with another question: What would Canada look like without Richard Bedford Bennett?

You wake up in the morning to your radio alarm, set to “Information Morning” on CBC radio. You hear that interest rates are holding and that Viola Desmond is going to be on the new ten dollar bill. Turning on Facebook, you read an article about the necessity of tipping servers in the United States, and can’t imagine what it would be like to only make $3.50 an hour. At least minimum wage guarantees some income here in Canada! Then your sister calls to find out what Remembrance Day service you will be attending next week. You have gone together to pay your respects since you were children. Your grandfather had died overseas.

RB Bennett founded the CBC!

RB Bennett founded the CBC!

Without RB Bennett, that entire scenario doesn’t happen.  Without RB Bennett, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation doesn’t exist. There is no Bank of Canada, so interest rates are all over the map depending on what bank you are at. Currency, let’s not get started on the politics there. Minimum wage? It is nothing but a dream. And who knows if you will be able to go to Remembrance Day services, since it’s not a national holiday.

And here’s an even bigger surprise – these four things are just the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Employment Insurance, Income Assistance, the Weekly Day of Rest Act, and the list goes on and on as to all of the things Bennett had a hand in making happen at the national level. Without RB Bennett, the Canada we love would have a very different social and political landscape.

The biggest deal of all is that he made it happen during one of the most difficult times in our country’s economic history – the Great Depression. He set the foundation for further social services and reform. Richard Bedford Bennett was the kid who lived next door, a shipbuilder’s son, a “Cape kid” that changed the face of Canada.

I’d say that is a pretty big deal.

If you’d like to know more about RB Bennett, come visit the Albert County Museum. Specifically, join us on July 1 to celebrate Canada 150 and for the special unveiling of a new feature to our museum, and other incredible additions to the RB Bennett Commemorative Centre.

For more information email melody@albertcountymuseum.com or call 734-2003.
 

*Thank you to Connecting Albert County for publishing this article.

 

June 21st – A day to celebrate, remember and reflect

June 21st – A day to celebrate, remember and reflect

Today, June 21st, is National Aboriginal Day in Canada and summer solstice. On the longest day of the year, Canadians can recognize the contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis people to our national culture. What does this mean to the people of Albert County, New Brunswick? For millennia, Mi'kmaq have lived in Albert County.